Wasted Talent

It’s a classic story. A taxi driver from Kenya recounts his former life as a surgeon, but now, since immigrating to the United States, he has been forced to take on work that doesn’t make use of his actual expertise.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, approximately 30 percent of foreign-born workers in the United States are equipped with a bachelor’s degree or higher, and yet one out of five of those well educated individuals is either unemployed or working a low-skill job, like dishwashing or taxi driving. Immigrants may not be alone in experiencing the Great Recession, but why are they still struggling harder than their native-born counterparts to secure work that suits their credentials?

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One comment

  1. I am not sure really how comfortable I would be with say a Doctor who could neither understand my concerns or I could not understand their instructions. In some professions you really do have to have enough understanding of the language to be proficient – it would be no different if we migrated to another country with little or no grasp of the language. One of someone’s responsibility is to learn the language if they are intending to stay and work and prosper. It doesn’t mean losing their cultural identity or speaking it at home, but enough to interact is helpful.

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